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A day in the life at a KS preschool

All KS preschools structure their days the same way, building a foundation rooted in Hawaiian culture and values that leads to a strong sense of identity and a lifelong joy of learning.

Hāmama ka ‘īpuka

Arrival

The preschool day starts with parents bringing their keiki to the classroom and signing in. During COVID-19, the arrival process also includes completing a daily wellness check and temperature check.

The goal is to support a positive transition from home to school.

Haumāna begin the day by engaging in quiet activities such as reading, writing, drawing, and listening to stories.

Piko

Morning protocol

During piko, haumāna and kumu engage in daily cultural and spiritual practice which includes pule, oli and mele.

As a part of piko, keiki learn place-based oli and mele that help them connect to one another, the ‘āina and their kūpuna.

Hālāwai

Circle time or large group meeting

Kumu and haumāna meet as a whole class for instructional time which may include a variety of learning experiences such as morning message, calendar, mele, mo‘olelo, show and tell and the introduction of a new lesson or learning center, etc. Keiki practice and learn important skills and behaviors such as participating in the group life of the classroom, taking turns, following rules, and asking questions — this helps to set a strong foundation for keiki to be ready to learn and to engage appropriately with peers and kumu.

Aloha, mālama and kuleana

Love, care and responsibility

Kumu create an environment of respectfulness, sincerity, and empathy. Keiki are expected to aloha each other, their environment and their community. Haumāna have individual kuleana to carry out during the day or week, and are encouraged to consider their collective kuleana to their classroom community. This teaches them the value of mālama, which leads to confidence, independence and social and environmental responsibility.

 
Aloha, mālama and kuleana

Love, care and responsibility

Kumu create an environment of respectfulness, sincerity, and empathy. Keiki are expected to aloha each other, their environment and their community. Haumāna have individual kuleana to carry out during the day or week, and are encouraged to consider their collective kuleana to their classroom community. This teaches them the value of mālama, which leads to confidence, independence and social and environmental responsibility.

‘Ai māmā and ‘aina awakea

Snack and lunch

Keiki are provided snacks twice a day — once in the morning and once in the afternoon, following nap. ‘Ohana send home lunches with keiki daily.

Snack time also develops social and language skills as table conversation is encouraged and facilitated.

Nā kauno‘o

Learning centers

Keiki engage in indoor and outdoor learning centers designed to provide opportunities to learn through Hawaiian culture-based education that promotes the development of gross and fine motor skills, social-emotional skills and academic competencies such as reading, writing, math and science.

‘Enehana

Technology integration

Technology is used as an instructional tool that supports the learning process and ‘ohana engagement. Digital tools like the haumāna’s iPad are used to facilitate and document a keiki’s learning and also as a tool to strengthen home-school connections and engagement.

Wā hiamoe

Nap time

Keiki rest in the classroom on their own sleeping mats.

A hui hou

End of day

To close the school day, keiki and kumu review the activities and learning for the day, plan for the next day, and end with mele, mo‘olelo, and pule before ‘ohana start to pick up their keiki.

 

Kawaiaha‘o Plaza

567 South King St
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 523-6200

KS Hawai‘i

16-716 Volcano Rd
Kea‘au, HI 96749
(808) 982-0000

KS Kapālama

1887 Makuakāne St
Honolulu, HI 96817
(808) 842-8211

KS Maui

275 ‘A‘apueo Pkwy
Pukalani, HI 96768
(808) 572-3100